Suzette Mayr’s Dr. Edith Vane and the Hares of Crawley Hall (2017)

2017-09-13T09:11:50+00:00

It's not quite as bad as Edith's dreams. Not quite. But almost. And that's because Suzette Mayr has a way of writing that pricks beneath the skin. "That night Edith dreams of hares. Hares hanging by their necks, throttled by catgut in a thicket of trees. Someone has executed

Suzette Mayr’s Dr. Edith Vane and the Hares of Crawley Hall (2017) 2017-09-13T09:11:50+00:00

The Trickster Story Eden Robinson Had To Write

2017-10-06T09:57:19+00:00

If you've glanced at the union regulations for Native writers, you'd have seen this one coming: Eden Robinson explains that it's a requirement. "It’s also a union regulation as a Native writer that you have to write a Trickster story at least once." (This is from an interview by

The Trickster Story Eden Robinson Had To Write 2017-10-06T09:57:19+00:00

In My Stacks, May 2016

2017-07-20T18:03:10+00:00

How much of your reading is non-fiction? Does it fluctuate, or are you committed to reading (or not reading) it? When others were participating in non-fiction November last year, and actually reading a lot of the books that I'd been kinda-half-sorta thinking about reading, I realised that tending towards fiction

In My Stacks, May 2016 2017-07-20T18:03:10+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Picnic” (1952)

2017-03-26T10:55:23+00:00

The weight of the brooch pulls the fabric of young Margaret Marshall's picnic frock. It always hangs just fine off her navy blue shorts, but the light-weight dress doesn't provide a suitable backdrop. How disappointing for young Margaret, who so treasures this gift from Madame Pégorin, the photo of the woman's beloved

Mavis Gallant’s “The Picnic” (1952) 2017-03-26T10:55:23+00:00

Margaret Millar’s The Listening Walls (1959; 2016)

2017-03-06T16:21:14+00:00

Although some of the characters in the Margaret Millar mysteries I have read answer their own phones, many answer other people's phones instead: the telephones of older or more privileged relatives or those of their bosses. There's even a switchboard operator in the mix, along with a woman better known

Margaret Millar’s The Listening Walls (1959; 2016) 2017-03-06T16:21:14+00:00