Margaret Millar’s Beyond This Point Are Monsters (1970; 2016)

2017-07-26T13:48:07+00:00

Many of Margaret Millar's characters have had an escape, often in the face of difficulty. Robert has achieved the ultimate escape - he has disappeared - and readers wonder whether that was deliberate or accidental, malicious or ambitious. "The world of Robert’s maps was nice and flat and simple. It

Margaret Millar’s Beyond This Point Are Monsters (1970; 2016) 2017-07-26T13:48:07+00:00

Margaret Millar’s How Like an Angel (1962)

2017-07-24T15:00:09+00:00

Exploring in the back country of Santa Barbara County California, Margaret Millar discovered a group of abandoned buildings on top of a ridge of the Santa Ynez mountains. The view was incredible: the Pacific Ocean, the Santa Ynez valley, Lake Cachuma, and the San Rafael mountains, along with a main

Margaret Millar’s How Like an Angel (1962) 2017-07-24T15:00:09+00:00

Margaret Millar’s Wives and Lovers (1954; 2016)

2017-07-24T15:00:28+00:00

Readers familiar with Margaret Millar's suspense novels, will immediately recognize her style and language in Wives and Lovers. (Just yesterday I discussed Vanish in an Instant, another volume in the Syndicate reprint series.) "It was a shoebox of a room, with the ceiling pressed down on it like a lid, and

Margaret Millar’s Wives and Lovers (1954; 2016) 2017-07-24T15:00:28+00:00

Mireille Silcoff’s Chez L’Arabe (2014)

2017-07-24T15:11:50+00:00

Weeks after reading these stories, a glance at the table of contents brings back their characters and arcs in a moment. (With "Flower Watching" and "Eskimos" I also required the aid of the characters' names I'd noted.) These stories stood out, not only as independent narratives but, simultaneously, for the

Mireille Silcoff’s Chez L’Arabe (2014) 2017-07-24T15:11:50+00:00

Broken: Careers, Contracts, Society

2014-09-29T08:11:50+00:00

Each of these novels considers a shattered state of being, whether the devastation plays out through the cycle of addiction or societal breakdown or international conflicts. The characters employ a variety of coping mechanisms and the authors' styles are diverse; Elizabeth Renzetti's Based on a True Story, Edan Lepucki's California and Audrey

Broken: Careers, Contracts, Society 2014-09-29T08:11:50+00:00