Mavis Gallant’s “The Wedding Ring” (1969)

2018-01-29T15:25:08+00:00

In “Madeline’s Birthday”, Madeline was sent to the Tracy family’s summer home: her divorced parents are elsewhere, living Madeline-free lives. “The Wedding Ring” tells a similar story, but from the daughter’s perspective: a first-person chronicle of the only child of a happily-divorced couple. The story begins quietly, as though

Mavis Gallant’s “The Wedding Ring” (1969) 2018-01-29T15:25:08+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Madeline’s Bithday” (1951)

2018-01-23T14:39:25+00:00

In “Madeline’s Birthday”, the sadness slips to the background, like it does in an Elizabeth Taylor story, with a hint of darkness besides. Madeline is a guest in the Tracy family’s summer home, and her seventeenth birthday affects every resident. Readers briefly inhabit the perspective of most inhabitants (even

Mavis Gallant’s “Madeline’s Bithday” (1951) 2018-01-23T14:39:25+00:00

Margaret Millar’s The Fiend (1964; 2016)

2017-07-26T13:34:30+00:00

From the outset, The Fiend has a creepy element which readers hadn't yet experienced in the fiction Margaret Millar had published theretofore. "She was about nine. Having watched them all impartially now for two weeks, Charlie had come to like her the best." You're afraid to ask, aren't you: why

Margaret Millar’s The Fiend (1964; 2016) 2017-07-26T13:34:30+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “About Geneva”

2017-03-26T12:44:34+00:00

Even the shortest story in The Other Paris provokes a strong sympathy on the part of readers. Bill Perlmutter: "Through A Soldier's Lens. Europe In The Fifties".Click for source details At the heart of the story are two young children, Ursula who is older than seven and Colin who

Mavis Gallant’s “About Geneva” 2017-03-26T12:44:34+00:00

Margaret Millar’s Wives and Lovers (1954; 2016)

2017-07-24T15:00:28+00:00

Readers familiar with Margaret Millar's suspense novels, will immediately recognize her style and language in Wives and Lovers. (Just yesterday I discussed Vanish in an Instant, another volume in the Syndicate reprint series.) "It was a shoebox of a room, with the ceiling pressed down on it like a lid, and

Margaret Millar’s Wives and Lovers (1954; 2016) 2017-07-24T15:00:28+00:00