Open a book this minute and start reading. Don’t move until you’ve reached page fifty. Until you’ve buried your thoughts in print. Cover yourself with words. Wash yourself away. Dissolve. Carol Shields Republic of Love

Nicolas Debon’s Four Pictures by Emily Carr (2003)

There are a number of ways in which one can get to know Emily Carr.

Groundwood Books – House of Anansi, 2003

First, for the bookish, via her own writing.

Klee Wick (1941), The Book of Small (1942), The House of All Sorts (1944), and, published posthumously, Growing Pains (1946), Pause (1953), The Heart of [...]

Sita’s Ramayana: A Feminist Retelling

As if it wasn’t enough to take The Ramayana and present it in images, this volume retells the ancient epic through the eyes of a woman. This is Sita’s Ramayana.

House of Anansi, 2011 Artwork by Moyna Chitrakar

The original Sanskrit text is attributed to the poet Valmiki, and it is comprised of 24,000 verses which tell [...]

The relationship of your nose to your book: adjust ratio, as required

On occasion, I have to wonder if perhaps  my grandmother and great-aunts didn’t have a point.

How many times did they instruct me that I should not, so often, have my nose in a book.

Because sometimes I really wonder how I missed something huge.

Like, for instance, Robert Lepage’s Dragon Trilogy playing at the [...]

Mariko Tamaki’s Skim (2008)

“Being 16 is officially the worst thing I’ve ever been.” That’s Kimberly Keiko Cameron (aka Skim) speaking.

Groundwood Books – House of Anansi, 2008

“Why do the students call you Skim?” her English teacher, Ms Archer asks.

“Because I’m not,” Skim answers.

Adolescence is such a horrid time: you’re called what you’re not, you [...]

BIP’s Snips: Thoughts on three books

Marguerite Abouet and Clément Oubrerie’s Aya de Yopougon 4 Gallimard, 2008

Read: At the table, because I said that I would use my dictionary to look up all the French words that I don’t know (of course I always say that, but I never do) Warning: As the fourth book in the series, I can’t imagine [...]

Drawing Conclusions: A Serial Reader, Plague Stories

What does Captain Trips mean anyway?

NY: Marvel Publishing Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, Writer Mike Perkins, Artwork Laura Marin, Colourist

If you could ask General Bill Starkey he would NOT say 99.4% communicability, 99.4% excess mortality.

He can’t say that: he works for the government.

But that’s what it means.

Readers of the graphic novel version [...]

Jeff Lemire’s Sweet Tooth Series

Jeff Lemire’s style is immediately recognizable. The colours are sombre, earthy. Faces are often smudged with shadow. Sometimes entire pages appear to be shadowed.

The lines are raw, sometimes inexact. Details in the background are sometimes perfectly drawn, like expertly squared tiles, and other times they are hasty cross-hatchings, a hint of a pattern rather [...]

Once Upon a Time Fragments

In which I chatter about Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief, the Mythlopedia series, the third in Bill Willingham’s Fables series, and make hasty notes about my other reading for the un-challenge.

The Lightning Thief is intended to be larger than life. Percy Jackson is not a normal boy.

He is a half-blood, half-mortal and half-immortal. [...]

Drawing Conclusions: A Serial Reader

We want that “paradoxical search for familiarity combined with strangeness; want more of the same – but with a difference,” says Victor Watson in Reading Series Fiction.

Watson’s book considers series written for children, but it still applies, doesn’t it? There’s nothing like reading a series.

Robert Kirkman’s The Walking Dead is one of my [...]

A Literary Three-Way: About a Boy? (I)

In eleventh-grade English class, we studied “Oedipus Rex” and I fell in love with the idea that a story so old could still be compelling.

But the idea of reading these classic texts outside a classroom seemed unthinkable. You know how some books become all-the-more intimidating the longer you leave them unread?

That’s how it [...]