Mavis Gallant’s “A Revised Guide to Paris” (1980)

2017-12-12T10:29:43+00:00

The first story in this Mavis Gallant reading project was "The Other Paris", the title story in her first collection. Therein, a young woman's dreams of Paris fell through (with her dreams of the romance she had imagined). Even after she became engaged to be married, Carol was weary of

Mavis Gallant’s “A Revised Guide to Paris” (1980) 2017-12-12T10:29:43+00:00

Marian Engel’s No Clouds of Glory #1968club

2017-10-30T08:13:14+00:00

If Marian Engel had not died mid-career, her name might have been as well known today as Margaret Atwood's today. Instead her name graces an award granted to a Canadian female writer mid-career by the Writers' Trust. A variety of forms, a strong feminist voice, challenging female characters, a fascination

Marian Engel’s No Clouds of Glory #1968club 2017-10-30T08:13:14+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Ice Wagon Going Down the Street” (1963)

2017-08-08T13:54:19+00:00

Reading this story might change your reading life forever. That's what happened to Peter Orner, whose essay on Mavis Gallant's stories is mesmerizing: "The Way Vivid, Way Underappreciated Short Stories of Mavis Gallant", published in The Atlantic's "By Heart" series. "The first story I read is called 'The Ice Wagon

Mavis Gallant’s “The Ice Wagon Going Down the Street” (1963) 2017-08-08T13:54:19+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Sunday Afternoon”

2017-07-28T11:21:07+00:00

As in "The Other Paris" and "The Cost of Living", a nineteen-year-old woman's dreams of romance in the city are feathering away in "Sunday Afternoon". Robert Capa Cafe de Flore 1962 "Veronica was a London girl. At first her dreams had been of Paris, but now they were

Mavis Gallant’s “Sunday Afternoon” 2017-07-28T11:21:07+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Cost of Living”

2017-08-11T13:53:25+00:00

It begins in darkness. South side of the Luxembourg Gardens "Louise, my sister, talked to Sylvie Laval for the first time on the stairs of our hotel on a winter afternoon. At five o’clock the skylight over the stairway and the blank, black windows on each of the

Mavis Gallant’s “The Cost of Living” 2017-08-11T13:53:25+00:00