Mazo de la Roche’s Mary Wakefield (1949)

2017-10-27T09:48:32+00:00

There were “few openings for women in the nineties” and, so, Mary Wakefield is forced to consider work as a governess in the 1890s. She is fortunate, in fact, that Ernest Whiteoak is seeking a governess for his brother’s young son (nine years old) and daughter (seven years old). Their mother

Mazo de la Roche’s Mary Wakefield (1949) 2017-10-27T09:48:32+00:00

Mazo de la Roche’s Morning at Jalna (1960)

2017-10-27T09:47:26+00:00

Although the last of the Jalna books written, Morning at Jalna is only the second in the sequence. It is set while the civil war is raging in the southern United States, and readers are immediately informed that the Whiteoaks are sympathetic to the southerners. In school, during the 1970s

Mazo de la Roche’s Morning at Jalna (1960) 2017-10-27T09:47:26+00:00

The First Jalna Story: Meeting Adeline

2017-10-27T09:47:46+00:00

In 1944, Mazo de la Roche published The Building of Jalna, nearly twenty years after she began to work with the Whiteoak family on the page. The beginning grew out of the middle, you might say. Jalna was actually written first, begun in 1925 and published in 1927: the fifth

The First Jalna Story: Meeting Adeline 2017-10-27T09:47:46+00:00

How Much Happiness, Really

2017-07-25T11:20:32+00:00

Is it too much? Or, just enough. What am I to make of this final story in my Alice Munro reading project. (I read her last collection, Dear Life, in 2012.) While rereading Too Much Happiness, I was constantly aware of the references to being happy, to happiness, in the

How Much Happiness, Really 2017-07-25T11:20:32+00:00

“Wood” Alice Munro

2017-07-25T11:20:34+00:00

Strangely enough, although I read this story twice earlier this year as well, when I scanned the table of contents I could not place it. Planning to reread for a third time this morning, I had no idea; it wasn't until the talk of the truck and Roy's need to gather the wood

“Wood” Alice Munro 2017-07-25T11:20:34+00:00