Mavis Gallant’s “Paola and Renata” (1965)

2017-11-13T17:57:06+00:00

The widow has let her hair go. It is half mahogany and half dull grey. Not only grey, but dull grey. Paola and Renata's listening that summer One has the sense that being a widow might have brought this about. The simple act of inhabiting widowhood. But that

Mavis Gallant’s “Paola and Renata” (1965) 2017-11-13T17:57:06+00:00

Such a Lovely Little War: A Memoir

2017-09-14T13:06:34+00:00

A child's experience of war is strangely pure and slanted. The impact is wholly dramatic at times. Its inconsequence just as overwhelming at other times. Sharing his experiences growing up in a French-Vietnamese family in Saigon, between 1961 and 1963, Marcelino Truong's graphic memoir is vibrant and informative. Some

Such a Lovely Little War: A Memoir 2017-09-14T13:06:34+00:00

Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing (2017)

2017-09-07T17:04:14+00:00

The dead fuel Jesmyn Ward's novels. She feels the weight of their stories; she shoulders them, shares them. In Sing, Unburied, Sing, their chorus of voices - even in the epigraphs but also in the novel - reverberates between and beyond the covers. Ward's are heart-shattering stories. But they

Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing (2017) 2017-09-07T17:04:14+00:00

The Irish Family: Kate O’Brien, Anakana Schofield, and Lisa McInerney

2017-09-18T10:58:03+00:00

These are the kinds of stories which expose the imperfections which lie beneath a carefully smoothed comforter. Honest characterization is key, Lisa McInerney explains to Marie Gethins,: "There is absolutely no element or aspect of their characters’ lives a writer should shy away from presenting, no matter how unpleasant.

The Irish Family: Kate O’Brien, Anakana Schofield, and Lisa McInerney 2017-09-18T10:58:03+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Cost of Living”

2017-08-11T13:53:25+00:00

It begins in darkness. South side of the Luxembourg Gardens "Louise, my sister, talked to Sylvie Laval for the first time on the stairs of our hotel on a winter afternoon. At five o’clock the skylight over the stairway and the blank, black windows on each of the

Mavis Gallant’s “The Cost of Living” 2017-08-11T13:53:25+00:00