Summer 2019, In My Reading Log

2019-08-27T13:41:48-05:00

In Iris Murdoch’s Henry and Cato (1976), Henry Marshalson inherits the family estate when his brother Sandy dies. Henry returns to the home where his mother Gerda still lives, with her kinda-sycophantic admirer, Lucius. Cato lives nearby. So does Colette. Stephanie does not, but, because of her pre-existing

Summer 2019, In My Reading Log2019-08-27T13:41:48-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Voices Lost in Snow” (1976)

2019-04-09T12:16:49-05:00

You might remember that, back when we met Linnet Muir, four stories ago, she explained her particular kind of aloneness. unsplash-logoCris DiNoto This story travels back in time further than the previous three and creates a deeper understanding of her state of being. Even in childhood, Linnet was alone. Even

Mavis Gallant’s “Voices Lost in Snow” (1976)2019-04-09T12:16:49-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Varieties of Exile” (1976)

2019-04-23T10:15:14-05:00

The thing about reading the third Linnet Muir story is that I know her now. At least, I feel like I do. Which is the deep appeal of a linked collection, the sense of gradual immersion. It’s the same phenomenon that pulls you back to a familiar series, a fledgling

Mavis Gallant’s “Varieties of Exile” (1976)2019-04-23T10:15:14-05:00
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