Winter 2020: In My Reading Log (Part One)

2021-01-06T14:29:55-05:00

Before I post about the new reading year, there are a few memorable reads from my 2020 log that I haven’t mentioned yet. Like Pourin’ Down Rain, Cheryl Foggo's memoir about growing up in 1960s Calgary, in a small and tight-knit Black community. When she was young, she heard

Winter 2020: In My Reading Log (Part One)2021-01-06T14:29:55-05:00

June 2019, In My Stacks

2019-06-19T17:52:40-05:00

In which I stack equal numbers of books into piles and hope that nobody notices that I have maxed out the loans on my library card. But, I hasten to add, I am still reading from my own shelves too. Anyway, all of these are long-time shelf-sitters or TBR-list

June 2019, In My Stacks2019-06-19T17:52:40-05:00

Louise Erdrich’s The Master Butchers Singing Club (2003)

2018-08-09T11:07:47-05:00

Unsurprisingly, there is a lot of talk of tissue and blood in this story and simmering beneath. Bodies and carcasses (and not all in the expected places) are salved and slaughtered, vulnerabilities exposed and secrets maintained. The intimacy which I longed for in The Beet Queen (1986) pulses and surges

Louise Erdrich’s The Master Butchers Singing Club (2003)2018-08-09T11:07:47-05:00

May 2016, In My Stacks

2018-07-11T14:56:14-05:00

How much of your reading is non-fiction? Does it fluctuate, or are you committed to reading (or not reading) it? When others were participating in non-fiction November last year, and actually reading a lot of the books that I'd been kinda-half-sorta thinking about reading, I realised that tending towards fiction

May 2016, In My Stacks2018-07-11T14:56:14-05:00

Louis Riel: On the Page, On the Stage

2019-05-11T19:55:12-05:00

The Canadian Opera Company is now presenting a new 50th-anniversary production of "Louis Riel", originally written for the celebration of the Canadian centenary in 1967, with an attempt to shift that oh-so-colonial gaze, now including indigenous artists and languages with more nuanced representations of the historical figures. These are powerfully important

Louis Riel: On the Page, On the Stage2019-05-11T19:55:12-05:00
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