Quarterly Stories: Autumn 2016

2016-11-07T11:59:15-05:00

Only ten this year, so far. Without my Alice Munro project to steer me, I am not reading as many short story collections now. Over the summer, I read Cherie Dimaline's A Gentle Habit (2015) as part of All Lit Up's summer bookclub. Dimaline is a member of the Georgian

Quarterly Stories: Autumn 20162016-11-07T11:59:15-05:00

Austin Clarke’s The Meeting Point (1967)

2015-10-06T10:02:44-05:00

The first volume of his Toronto trilogy introduces readers to Bernice Leach, who has left Barbados to work in Toronto as a housekeeper in an upscale neighbourhood in the 1960s. She has left behind a son and his father, as well as a mother and a sister, and she is

Austin Clarke’s The Meeting Point (1967)2015-10-06T10:02:44-05:00

May 2014, In My Bookbag

2014-05-22T10:42:20-05:00

Are you still there? If so, many thanks. It’s been quiet around here; I realized that my database had tripled its allotted storage and was refusing to hold even one more byte sometime in March, and the oh-so-smart-coder-types have only recently gotten things back in working order. Many thanks to

May 2014, In My Bookbag2014-05-22T10:42:20-05:00

Dominique Fortier’s Wonder (2010; Trans. 2014)

2014-05-13T11:30:44-05:00

The appeal of reading a book like Dominique Fortier’s Wonder swells and radiates as pages turn. McClelland & Stewart, 2014 The story begins (like Dennison Smith’s The Eye of the Day, another of my favourite books in this reading year) with a proverbial bang. But despite the eruption

Dominique Fortier’s Wonder (2010; Trans. 2014)2014-05-13T11:30:44-05:00

Cecil Foster’s Independence (2014)

2014-07-11T17:08:05-05:00

Desmond has returned to the island because the prime minister has asked those who went abroad to help rebuild the nation, now that it has gained its independence. Harper Collins Publishers, 2014 Cecil Foster's experience is not unlike Desmond's, but Independence is rooted in the story of a

Cecil Foster’s Independence (2014)2014-07-11T17:08:05-05:00
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