Padma Viswanathan’s The Ever After of Ashwin Rao (2014)

2014-09-15T11:34:23-05:00

The dedication to Padma Viswanathan's second novel: For the lost, and for the living. Random House of Canada, 2014 Therein, the reader haa a clue, for The Ever After of Ashwin Rao is equally preoccupied with losing and living. The novel opens in 2004, on the precipice of the trial which

Padma Viswanathan’s The Ever After of Ashwin Rao (2014)2014-09-15T11:34:23-05:00

Quarterly Stories: Spring 2014

2020-09-16T15:56:42-05:00

In collection reading, since Quarterly Stories: Winter 2013 I've read Susie Moloney's Things Withered, the latest installment of the Alice Munro reading project, B.J. Novak's One More Thing, and the most recent volume of Journey Prize stories.  But mostly I've been dipping into single stories in recent months. Partly this was inspired by random samplings of the latest ReLit

Quarterly Stories: Spring 20142020-09-16T15:56:42-05:00

Indu Sundaresan’s The Mountain of Light (2013)

2020-03-31T12:17:55-05:00

Take Tanis Rideout's Above All Things or Mary Novik's Muse: history is stuffed with stories begging to be retold. "Fiction and nonfiction both have to be true, but nonfiction has to be fact-checkable as well." So says Phllip Gourevitch. Indu Sundaresan's The Mountain of Light might not be fact-checkable, but

Indu Sundaresan’s The Mountain of Light (2013)2020-03-31T12:17:55-05:00

Shree Ghatage’s Awake When All the World is Asleep (1997)

2014-03-20T15:11:08-05:00

Two years before everybody was talking about Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies, Shree Ghatage's collection was published. Awake When All the World is Asleep considers similar themes, and also presents a wide variety of narrators in both Indian and North American settings. (Okay, it didn't win a Pulitzer, but

Shree Ghatage’s Awake When All the World is Asleep (1997)2014-03-20T15:11:08-05:00

Anita Rau Badami’s Tamarind Mem (1996)

2014-03-13T20:18:23-05:00

Anita Rau Badami's Tamarind Mem (1996) Penguin Books, 1998 Tamarind Mem opens with a telephone call, from Kamini (who is studying in Calgary) to her mother (in India). Tension mingles with fondness: it’s an introduction in broad strokes. The conversation is relayed from Kamini’s perspective and then the narrative slips

Anita Rau Badami’s Tamarind Mem (1996)2014-03-13T20:18:23-05:00
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