Mavis Gallant’s “In Transit”

2019-12-23T20:15:50-05:00

An airport is as good as a train for setting a story in, when that story is about change. So here we are, in the Helsinki airport for this very short, titular story by Mavis Gallant. (And can I just say: how wonderful is the ‘net for locating images,

Mavis Gallant’s “In Transit”2019-12-23T20:15:50-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “With a Capital T”

2019-04-09T12:45:50-05:00

In this story, Linnet is “seamless”, she is “as smooth as brass”. And she has returned to her godmother’s house, as a journalist, sent to conduct an interview. She has written down her assignment, like any other, without commenting that the woman is her godmother. unsplash-logoMatt Artz She is hesitant,

Mavis Gallant’s “With a Capital T”2019-04-09T12:45:50-05:00

Spring 2018, In My Bookbag

2018-05-31T13:06:45-05:00

In which there is talk of the slim stories which have travelled with me within the city, while bulkier volumes stayed home. Amitav Ghosh's Flood of Fire and Paul Auster's 4 3 2 1are awkward travelling companions. As are some of the skinnies in my current stack, like Iris Murdoch's

Spring 2018, In My Bookbag2018-05-31T13:06:45-05:00

November 2016, In My Reading Log

2016-12-01T16:53:02-05:00

In the wake of my IFOA reading list and the literary prizelists of the season, my November reading felt relatively whimsical. Without duedates attached to the majority of my reading, it was a pleasure to slip into volumes which had sat untouched in recent weeks. Each of these three volumes covers,

November 2016, In My Reading Log2016-12-01T16:53:02-05:00

Deni Ellis Béchard’s Into the Sun (2016)

2020-01-07T11:17:37-05:00

Have you ever missed your stop on public transit because of a book? House of Anansi, 2016 Into the Sun is so gripping, from the start, that I travelled four stops past my own stop, before I even realized that I had missed it. (Then, I was so surprised,

Deni Ellis Béchard’s Into the Sun (2016)2020-01-07T11:17:37-05:00
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