Quarterly Stories: Winter 2020

2020-12-18T16:04:12-05:00

Bergen, Guenther, Kellough, Mosley and Thammavongsa Short Stories in October, November and December Whether in a dedicated collection or a magazine, these stories capture a variety of reading moods. This quarter, I returned to three familiar writers and also explored two new-to-me story writers.

Quarterly Stories: Winter 20202020-12-18T16:04:12-05:00

Here and Elsewhere: New York City

2020-12-18T16:30:46-05:00

When I was a girl, I walked the streets of New York City with Harriet the Spy. And I revisited it regularly via Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. From a young age, this was a city I recognized on the page, a place that felt real, a

Here and Elsewhere: New York City2020-12-18T16:30:46-05:00

Jean-Christophe Réhel’s Tatouine (2018; Trans. Katherine Hastings & Peter McCambridge, 2020)

2020-09-30T08:44:22-05:00

Jean-Christophe Réhel’s Tatouine is every bit as remarkable as QC Fiction’s earlier offerings. Other QC Fiction titles are reviewed here (if you enjoy a wickedly operatic story), here (if you prefer to feel a little heart-broken for a long while), here (if you wonder what it would be like

Jean-Christophe Réhel’s Tatouine (2018; Trans. Katherine Hastings & Peter McCambridge, 2020)2020-09-30T08:44:22-05:00

Adam Wilson’s Sensation Machines (2020)

2020-09-29T17:30:48-05:00

Adam Wilson’s Sensation Machines (2020) is smart and disturbing, subversive and entertaining. It’s set in an eerily could-be-now New York City: “Headlines warned of rising sea levels and methane emissions. Chronicled the continuing barrage of Weinstein-esque behavior in politics and entertainment. Addressed the uptick in anti-immigration violence in the

Adam Wilson’s Sensation Machines (2020)2020-09-29T17:30:48-05:00

Winter 2019: In My Reading Log

2021-01-06T12:23:29-05:00

There’s a shadow over Cherie Dimaline’s latest novel, Empire of Wild (2019). Part of it could appear in a history text: “In the church and at his Catholic day school, the priests called seven the age of reason. Moshom called it the age of learning how the hell to

Winter 2019: In My Reading Log2021-01-06T12:23:29-05:00
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