Adam Wilson’s Sensation Machines (2020)

2020-09-29T17:30:48-05:00

Adam Wilson’s Sensation Machines (2020) is smart and disturbing, subversive and entertaining. It’s set in an eerily could-be-now New York City: “Headlines warned of rising sea levels and methane emissions. Chronicled the continuing barrage of Weinstein-esque behavior in politics and entertainment. Addressed the uptick in anti-immigration violence in the

Adam Wilson’s Sensation Machines (2020)2020-09-29T17:30:48-05:00

New Homes, Other Homes: Emigration and Immigration

2018-05-30T16:18:40-05:00

There are many amazing stories about moving from somewhere to elsewhere, about the process of elsewhere becoming somewhere. Take Rabindranath Maharaj's The Amazing Absorbing Boy - literally, amazing. It's right there on the cover. It's a real favourite of mine, in which seventeen-year-old Samuel reads comic books in Trinidad to

New Homes, Other Homes: Emigration and Immigration2018-05-30T16:18:40-05:00

Winter Child and Firewater: A Perfect Pairing

2019-05-11T19:52:22-05:00

Each of these books is penned by an indigenous writer, each considers a great loss, each is powerful on its own terms. Together their stories resonate and amplify readers' understanding of a vitally important issue. Virginia Pésémapéo Bordeleau's novel Winter Child appears to be the simpler tale. One woman's

Winter Child and Firewater: A Perfect Pairing2019-05-11T19:52:22-05:00

Quarterly Stories: Autumn 2016

2016-11-07T11:59:15-05:00

Only ten this year, so far. Without my Alice Munro project to steer me, I am not reading as many short story collections now. Over the summer, I read Cherie Dimaline's A Gentle Habit (2015) as part of All Lit Up's summer bookclub. Dimaline is a member of the Georgian

Quarterly Stories: Autumn 20162016-11-07T11:59:15-05:00

Maisie Hurley and “The Native Voice”

2016-07-31T12:30:26-05:00

One woman, one newspaper: The Native Voice is a story with relevance far beyond any existing borders, as well as a work of importance for local historians in what is now called British Columbia, Canada. Caitlin Press, 2016 Eric Jamieson's book is of fundamental interest to any reader

Maisie Hurley and “The Native Voice”2016-07-31T12:30:26-05:00
Go to Top