Laura Trethewey’s The Imperilled Ocean: Human Stories from a Changing Sea #ReadtheChange

2020-10-14T09:38:42-05:00

Nobody needs to convince you that the ocean is vast. But relevant? Readers who share Trethewey’s belief that “the ocean’s story is also our own” will be more likely to pick up this volume. Many of us understand her launching spot: “The watery surface is a place of transit

Laura Trethewey’s The Imperilled Ocean: Human Stories from a Changing Sea #ReadtheChange2020-10-14T09:38:42-05:00

Riel Nason’s All the Things We Leave Behind (2016)

2017-07-24T14:51:11-05:00

The title of her second novel might well have been a discarded option for her debut; Riel Nason is back in familiar territory: the intersection between memory and identity, the line between mysticism and madness, and sibling bonds in a coming-of-age tale. Goose Lane, 2016 Now it is 1977

Riel Nason’s All the Things We Leave Behind (2016)2017-07-24T14:51:11-05:00

Riel Nason’s The Town that Drowned (2011)

2016-11-10T10:58:28-05:00

Nothing really happens. Here, the "main event is simply a view of the water". So Ruby's story should not be a page-turner. But, in fact, The Town that Drowned is a coming-of-age story with a curious momentum. No single element is responsible: character and voice, setting and structure, all work

Riel Nason’s The Town that Drowned (2011)2016-11-10T10:58:28-05:00

Nick Cutter’s The Deep (2015)

2015-01-14T08:16:36-05:00

Nick Cutter’s debut, The Troop, was one of those books about which I was truly ambivalent, literally thunking the book down after a haunting and visceral scene and snatching it up again because I simply had to know what was going to happen next. I recommended it widely to friends

Nick Cutter’s The Deep (2015)2015-01-14T08:16:36-05:00
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