Austin Clarke’s The Meeting Point (1967)

2015-10-06T10:02:44-05:00

The first volume of his Toronto trilogy introduces readers to Bernice Leach, who has left Barbados to work in Toronto as a housekeeper in an upscale neighbourhood in the 1960s. She has left behind a son and his father, as well as a mother and a sister, and she is

Austin Clarke’s The Meeting Point (1967)2015-10-06T10:02:44-05:00

October 2015, In My Reading Log

2017-07-24T14:58:14-05:00

I pulled André Alexis' Despair and Other Stories of Ottawa (1994) off my shelf when Fifteen Dogs was nominated for the Toronto Book Award (since then, FD has also been nominated for the Giller Prize and the Rogers' Writers' Trust Fiction Award). There aren't any notable four-legged characters, but the collection is fascinating.

October 2015, In My Reading Log2017-07-24T14:58:14-05:00

K.D. Miller’s All Saints (2014)

2015-02-16T21:28:42-05:00

My grandmother attended All Saints Church. Although I was not a devout child, I have many happy memories surrounding that small brick building: bazaars and bake sales, pancake suppers and holiday lunches. Biblioasis, 2014 None of my happy memories reside in the pews or at the altar, however; they are

K.D. Miller’s All Saints (2014)2015-02-16T21:28:42-05:00

On Power: Between and The Massey Murder

2019-10-22T12:24:17-05:00

Angie Adbou handles multiple narrative voices very well. Readers familiar with her earlier novels, The Bone Cage (2008) and The Canterbury Trail (2011) will know this, having inhabited narratives from varying perspectives. They will also know (as will readers of her 2006 collection of short stories, Anything Boys Can Do) that

On Power: Between and The Massey Murder2019-10-22T12:24:17-05:00

I Spy: Walt and Mr. Jones

2017-07-20T18:04:57-05:00

As much as these stories focus on solitary characters who observe, from the margins, they long for something else; Walt and Mr. Jones are ultimately preoccupied with relationships. Goose Lane Editions, 2014 Margaret Sweatman's Mr. Jones openly confronts duplicity. "His life had been contrary, a series of duplications: two homes; a father who’d

I Spy: Walt and Mr. Jones2017-07-20T18:04:57-05:00
Go to Top