Tanya Talaga’s Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death and Hard Truths in a Northern City

2017-11-28T10:54:11+00:00

Nominated for the Writers' Trust Prize for Non-Fiction in Canada, Tanya Talaga's book explores the situation which led to the deaths of seven Indigenous high school students in the Thunder Bay area, five of them in the rivers surrounding Lake Superior. The sense of northern community which might be

Tanya Talaga’s Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death and Hard Truths in a Northern City 2017-11-28T10:54:11+00:00

Autumn 2017 In My Reading Log (Non-fiction and Not-quite-fiction)

2017-10-25T17:17:49+00:00

In which there is talk of true stories and stories that fall between the cracks of imagined facts and probabilities. Kyo Maclear's Birds Art Life (2017) Arranged as though composed over a twelve-month period, this would seem to be the perfect book to read slowly, meditatively. To allow the pages

Autumn 2017 In My Reading Log (Non-fiction and Not-quite-fiction) 2017-10-25T17:17:49+00:00

Looking for Light: Humour in the Stacks (6 Reads)

2017-10-06T17:25:32+00:00

Do you ever feel the weight of your stack? Many of the books I've been reading have been rigorous and demanding. Commodore Ajith Boyagoda's story of imprisonment in Sri Lanka, Marcelino Truong's memories of coming-of-age in Vietnam between 1961 and 1963, Shirin Ebadi's work for human rights in Iran, Solmaz

Looking for Light: Humour in the Stacks (6 Reads) 2017-10-06T17:25:32+00:00

Winter Child and Firewater: A Perfect Pairing

2017-10-06T15:03:12+00:00

Each of these books is penned by an indigenous writer, each considers a great loss, each is powerful on its own terms. Together their stories resonate and amplify readers' understanding of a vitally important issue. Virginia Pésémapéo Bordeleau's novel Winter Child appears to be the simpler tale. One woman's

Winter Child and Firewater: A Perfect Pairing 2017-10-06T15:03:12+00:00

Reading South Sudan: Witnessing

2017-10-06T11:16:41+00:00

First, the matter of getting situated. In this, the largest country in Africa, geographically, nearly twice the size of Alaska: Sudan. Its peoples speak 134 different languages, more than 400 if one counts distinct dialects. It officially declared independence on January 1, 1956. North of Sudan is the Sahara

Reading South Sudan: Witnessing 2017-10-06T11:16:41+00:00