Laura Trethewey’s The Imperilled Ocean: Human Stories from a Changing Sea #ReadtheChange

2020-09-04T13:39:17-05:00

Nobody needs to convince you that the ocean is vast. But relevant? Readers who share Trethewey’s belief that “the ocean’s story is also our own” will be more likely to pick up this volume. Many of us understand her launching spot: “The watery surface is a place of transit

Laura Trethewey’s The Imperilled Ocean: Human Stories from a Changing Sea #ReadtheChange2020-09-04T13:39:17-05:00

David Berry’s On Nostalgia (2020)

2020-07-29T14:10:05-05:00

“Everything written down these days and worth reading is oriented towards nostalgia,” one of the characters in Julio Cortázar’s Hopscotch declares. How handy to have David Berry’s new book On Nostalgia within reach, to illustrate the enduring interest in the matter, decades later. (Cortázar’s novel was published in Spanish

David Berry’s On Nostalgia (2020)2020-07-29T14:10:05-05:00

The Writing Life: Flannery O’Connor (4 of 4)

2020-07-31T11:49:38-05:00

Have you been on the edge of your seat? The fourth and last of my planned posts on Flannery O’Connor has been delayed (the first, second, and third were published weeks ago) while library transfers were pending. Meanwhile, a new documentary has also been released, although currently only available

The Writing Life: Flannery O’Connor (4 of 4)2020-07-31T11:49:38-05:00

Deni Béchard’s Empty Hands, Open Arms (2013) #ReadtheChange

2020-05-15T15:05:42-05:00

Before reading this book, the strongest connotation I had with Kinshasa was its central significance in the co-operative boardgame Pandemic. There are a handful of cities on each continent and players coordinate the strengths of their roles to stop the spread of disease; these days, it’s hardly light entertainment.

Deni Béchard’s Empty Hands, Open Arms (2013) #ReadtheChange2020-05-15T15:05:42-05:00

The Writing Life: Flannery O’Connor (3 of 4)

2020-04-13T16:37:21-05:00

O’Connor’s religiosity is inescapable. When she was studying at Iowa, she attended morning mass daily. In her prayer journal, she clearly requests spiritual intervention to guide her craft. While I do not gravitate towards the meditative passages and debates in her letters about her Catholicism – and often skim

The Writing Life: Flannery O’Connor (3 of 4)2020-04-13T16:37:21-05:00
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