Mavis Gallant’s “Questions and Answers” (1965)

2020-01-07T11:19:34-05:00

Flickering and Imprecise: the first words I jotted down, while reading this Mavis Gallant story. It struck me that perhaps one of the reasons that her stories have endured is that her style is uncluttered and direct: there aren’t a lot of adjectives or adverbs, so when something –

Mavis Gallant’s “Questions and Answers” (1965)2020-01-07T11:19:34-05:00

Overflow for #1965Club Reading

2019-05-03T11:51:34-05:00

When you have 8,409 books on your TBR list, the smallest detail can boost a handful of them to the top of the stack. Which feels tremendously specific. And terrifically random. So when Karen and Simon chose 1965 as their next reading year inspiration, a few books presented themselves

Overflow for #1965Club Reading2019-05-03T11:51:34-05:00

Marie-Claire Blais, Reading for the #1965Club

2019-04-29T09:17:10-05:00

If you are reading this post because you are part of the #1965Club, and you haven’t heard of Marie-Claire Blais, you are about to wonder how that can be true. (And if you also haven't heard of #1965Club, please visit Karen's and Simon's sites to learn more.)  Blais has published

Marie-Claire Blais, Reading for the #1965Club2019-04-29T09:17:10-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Virus X” (1965)

2019-03-20T09:49:50-05:00

Vera’s sister-in-law sends tins of aspirin in her care packages, always with one pill missing. Nobody knows why, and, at the heart of it, this is what this forty-page-long story is all about. Nah, I’m making a joke. Actually, stealing one. Because it’s Vera who thinks it’s amusing to lend

Mavis Gallant’s “Virus X” (1965)2019-03-20T09:49:50-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Orphans’ Progress” (1965)

2019-03-05T17:42:12-05:00

Language is important in “Orphans’ Progress”, specifically the relationship between English-speakers in Ontario and French-speakers in Quebec (predominantly Montreal, with a reference to Chicoutimi). It matters, immediately and lastingly, because the orphans, Cathie and Mildred, are the children of an English-Canadian man and a French-Canadian woman. Governor General's Award Winner

Mavis Gallant’s “Orphans’ Progress” (1965)2019-03-05T17:42:12-05:00
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