Michael Ondaatje’s Warlight (2018)

2018-08-02T16:41:25-05:00

If The Cat’s Table (2011) was a slow and steady unravelling of a young boy’s memories, yarn taut and tidy, Warlight is a mass of moth-eaten fragments, remnants of a finely-crafted woollen garment pulled from a trunk. A thing of beauty, yes, but the devastation is the first thing

Michael Ondaatje’s Warlight (2018)2018-08-02T16:41:25-05:00

Maybe and What’s Always Been Done: On Andrea MacPherson’s What We Once Believed (2017)

2017-10-12T14:27:56-05:00

I’ve loved the idea of a character named Maybe since I read Katheen Martin’s novel, Penny Maybe, about a sixteen-year-old girl working out all the possibilities ahead of her. Isn’t it just perfect for a coming-of-age story? And, indeed, in Andrea MacPherson’s novel, Maybe Collins is eleven years old

Maybe and What’s Always Been Done: On Andrea MacPherson’s What We Once Believed (2017)2017-10-12T14:27:56-05:00

Quarterly Stories: Autumn 2016

2016-11-07T11:59:15-05:00

Only ten this year, so far. Without my Alice Munro project to steer me, I am not reading as many short story collections now. Over the summer, I read Cherie Dimaline's A Gentle Habit (2015) as part of All Lit Up's summer bookclub. Dimaline is a member of the Georgian

Quarterly Stories: Autumn 20162016-11-07T11:59:15-05:00

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan’s Harmless Like You (2016)

2016-10-26T12:35:34-05:00

At the "Modern Families" roundtable at this year's IFOA, Rowan Hisayo Buchanan explained that it only felt natural to build her characters with the seemingly endless details that comprise their lives, their selves. Identity is clearly at the heart of her much-lauded debut, Harmless Like You, and a good part of

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan’s Harmless Like You (2016)2016-10-26T12:35:34-05:00
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