Writers in Novels: Eleanor Dark’s The Little Company (1945) #AWW

2021-01-19T17:26:44-05:00

It’s a time of “political and intellectual crisis” in The Little Company. Sound familiar? Drusilla Modjeska’s introduction situates readers in Dark’s depiction of ordinary life in Sydney and Katoomba, in this time of “recession, nuclear threat and more failed expectations” in Australia. The Little Company is Dark’s seventh novel,

Writers in Novels: Eleanor Dark’s The Little Company (1945) #AWW2021-01-19T17:26:44-05:00

How Awful Is It? Liz Nugent’s Little Cruelties (2020)

2020-11-12T12:47:19-05:00

Betty Smith gave simple advice to writers: “First: Be understanding always. Keep the understanding you have and add on to it.” As the author of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1943)—a best-selling novel that challenged the myth of poverty as a choice, and allowed low/no-wage characters to demonstrate courage

How Awful Is It? Liz Nugent’s Little Cruelties (2020)2020-11-12T12:47:19-05:00

Marion Poschmann’s The Pine Islands (2017; Trans. Jen Calleja 2020)

2020-09-29T17:31:26-05:00

Marion Poschmann’s The Pine Islands (2017; Trans. Jen Calleja 2020) was shortlisted for the International Booker Prize in 2019. The jury describes it like this: “A quirky, unpredictable and darkly comic confrontation with mortality.” Her first book was published in Germany in 2002 and, since, her work has been

Marion Poschmann’s The Pine Islands (2017; Trans. Jen Calleja 2020)2020-09-29T17:31:26-05:00

Adam Wilson’s Sensation Machines (2020)

2020-09-29T17:30:48-05:00

Adam Wilson’s Sensation Machines (2020) is smart and disturbing, subversive and entertaining. It’s set in an eerily could-be-now New York City: “Headlines warned of rising sea levels and methane emissions. Chronicled the continuing barrage of Weinstein-esque behavior in politics and entertainment. Addressed the uptick in anti-immigration violence in the

Adam Wilson’s Sensation Machines (2020)2020-09-29T17:30:48-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “In a War”

2020-09-29T16:24:03-05:00

In a passage near the end of “Let It Pass”, Steven observes the precarious nature of memory. He openly acknowledges its fallibility: “I have probably altered my recollection of that moment, changed its shape, refined it, as I still sometimes will tinker with shreds of a dream.” So when

Mavis Gallant’s “In a War”2020-09-29T16:24:03-05:00
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