Thomas King’s A Matter of Malice (2019) #ReadIndigenous

2019-05-19T17:35:06-05:00

Beginning June 1, through June 21, I’ll be sharing a recommended read by an indigenous author each day on Twitter. Today, here, a bonus to celebrate: thoughts on the latest Thomas King mystery set in Chinook. On June 1st, June 7th and June 21st, check back for more recent

Thomas King’s A Matter of Malice (2019) #ReadIndigenous2019-05-19T17:35:06-05:00

Québecois Reads: Sealing the Deal

2019-05-27T18:57:14-05:00

The title of Pasha Malla’s 2015 article in The New Yorker’s Page-Turner says it all: “Too Different and Too Familiar: The Challenge of French-Canadian Literature.” Because it is a challenge to locate French-Canadian literature within the landscape of Canadian Literature, even for those of us who devote a significant

Québecois Reads: Sealing the Deal2019-05-27T18:57:14-05:00

Marie-Claire Blais, Reading for the #1965Club

2019-04-29T09:17:10-05:00

If you are reading this post because you are part of the #1965Club, and you haven’t heard of Marie-Claire Blais, you are about to wonder how that can be true. (And if you also haven't heard of #1965Club, please visit Karen's and Simon's sites to learn more.)  Blais has published

Marie-Claire Blais, Reading for the #1965Club2019-04-29T09:17:10-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Voices Lost in Snow” (1976)

2019-04-09T12:16:49-05:00

You might remember that, back when we met Linnet Muir, four stories ago, she explained her particular kind of aloneness. unsplash-logoCris DiNoto This story travels back in time further than the previous three and creates a deeper understanding of her state of being. Even in childhood, Linnet was alone. Even

Mavis Gallant’s “Voices Lost in Snow” (1976)2019-04-09T12:16:49-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Varieties of Exile” (1976)

2019-04-23T10:15:14-05:00

The thing about reading the third Linnet Muir story is that I know her now. At least, I feel like I do. Which is the deep appeal of a linked collection, the sense of gradual immersion. It’s the same phenomenon that pulls you back to a familiar series, a fledgling

Mavis Gallant’s “Varieties of Exile” (1976)2019-04-23T10:15:14-05:00