Mavis Gallant’s “April Fish” (1968)

2020-01-29T10:49:53-05:00

In the previous story, we have Harold’s mother reminiscing about her earlier trips to the mountains, when it was just her and her husband, Harold’s father. She observes that it was one thing to think of skiing down the slopes into town when she was a young woman; now

Mavis Gallant’s “April Fish” (1968)2020-01-29T10:49:53-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Statues Taken Down” (1965)

2019-12-24T08:18:22-05:00

Readers never meet her directly, but we are told that she looks like the Holbein portrait of Lady Barker. (Here shown in such a way that it’s easy to imagine a wallet photo.) This is the mother of Hal and Dorothy. Once George Crawley’s wife. On the surface, this

Mavis Gallant’s “The Statues Taken Down” (1965)2019-12-24T08:18:22-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “An Emergency Case”

2019-11-04T20:24:27-05:00

Some might be surprised that Mavis Gallant gets children, that she can as easily climb inside their view on the world as she does. I'm thinking about stories like About Geneva and The Rejection. But these children feel apart from the others around them, as though their relationships with

Mavis Gallant’s “An Emergency Case”2019-11-04T20:24:27-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Voices Lost in Snow” (1976)

2019-04-09T12:16:49-05:00

You might remember that, back when we met Linnet Muir, four stories ago, she explained her particular kind of aloneness. unsplash-logoCris DiNoto This story travels back in time further than the previous three and creates a deeper understanding of her state of being. Even in childhood, Linnet was alone. Even

Mavis Gallant’s “Voices Lost in Snow” (1976)2019-04-09T12:16:49-05:00

Quarterly Stories: Winter 2018

2019-03-20T14:18:02-05:00

Faust, Gallant, Hawley, Madsen and Ross Short Stories in October, November and December "It was a long time - a long time watching him the way you watch a finger tightening slowly in the trigger of a gun – and then suddenly wrenching himself to action

Quarterly Stories: Winter 20182019-03-20T14:18:02-05:00
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