Shadow Giller: Ian Williams’ Reproduction (2019)

2019-10-21T13:49:25-05:00

Ian Williams landed in my stack with his longlisting for the ReLit Award in 2011. This is why I read prizelists: they encourage me to read in different directions, when left to my own devices, I sometimes plod along, in familiar reading territory, simply out of habit. The title

Shadow Giller: Ian Williams’ Reproduction (2019)2019-10-21T13:49:25-05:00

Québecois Reads: Sealing the Deal

2019-05-27T18:57:14-05:00

The title of Pasha Malla’s 2015 article in The New Yorker’s Page-Turner says it all: “Too Different and Too Familiar: The Challenge of French-Canadian Literature.” Because it is a challenge to locate French-Canadian literature within the landscape of Canadian Literature, even for those of us who devote a significant

Québecois Reads: Sealing the Deal2019-05-27T18:57:14-05:00

Shadow Giller: Eric Dupont’s Songs for the Cold of Heart (2012; Trans. Peter McCambridge, 2018)

2018-11-17T16:06:21-05:00

Shadow Giller review contents: In Short, a 300-word and spoiler-free summary, intended to have a broad appeal; In Detail, elaborating on one aspect of the book which I found remarkable (perhaps only interesting for others who have read the book or who have an interest more mechanical aspects of

Shadow Giller: Eric Dupont’s Songs for the Cold of Heart (2012; Trans. Peter McCambridge, 2018)2018-11-17T16:06:21-05:00

Mazo de la Roche’s Whiteoak Harvest (1936)

2018-07-31T13:46:21-05:00

“I dare say old Red-head will be delighted. If there is one thing above another that pleases him it is an addition to the clan.” That’s Renny and, it’s true, his heart beats for Jalna, which is where the Whiteoaks are. But he has standards. He’s not about the

Mazo de la Roche’s Whiteoak Harvest (1936)2018-07-31T13:46:21-05:00

Reading for #WomenInTranslation Month

2018-11-05T19:04:55-05:00

What a fine author with whom to launch Women in Translation month (hosted by Biblibio) one of the few contemporary authors whose work I have followed from the beginning in Sheila Fischman’s translations: Ru (2009; 2012) and Mãn (2013; 2014). Themes from both of her previous novels resurface in Vi, and

Reading for #WomenInTranslation Month2018-11-05T19:04:55-05:00
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