Mavis Gallant’s “The Prodigal Parent” (1969)

2018-08-27T09:11:40-05:00

Like the sand dollar that Rhoda’s father slips into his pocket, this is a gritty story. Her sister Joanne repatriated their father, with an air passage to back the claim, and now he has come to live with Joanne. “Then waja come here for?” “Because Regan sent me on

Mavis Gallant’s “The Prodigal Parent” (1969)2018-08-27T09:11:40-05:00

Survival of the Funniest

2018-05-29T10:50:19-05:00

Researching Dawn Dumont, to review her most recent collection, Glass Beads, this quote leapt out at me: "If you can laugh then you can survive until the solution arrives." (Room Magazine, interview with Theressa Slind) It's easy to dismiss funny books as light, insubstantial. To call them

Survival of the Funniest2018-05-29T10:50:19-05:00

On Being Married – Happily and Unhappily – and Reading Around

2017-10-30T11:30:28-05:00

Sarah Dunn's new novel, The Arrangement takes Owen and Lucy, who are imagining themselves unhappily married in the future, and encourages them to sleep around. The idea comes to the happily married couple via a conversation at a dinner party, which is also how Sarah Dunn came upon the idea

On Being Married – Happily and Unhappily – and Reading Around2017-10-30T11:30:28-05:00

The Trickster Story Eden Robinson Had To Write

2017-10-06T09:57:19-05:00

If you've glanced at the union regulations for Native writers, you'd have seen this one coming: Eden Robinson explains that it's a requirement. "It’s also a union regulation as a Native writer that you have to write a Trickster story at least once." (This is from an interview by

The Trickster Story Eden Robinson Had To Write2017-10-06T09:57:19-05:00

Margaret Millar’s A Stranger in My Grave (1960)

2017-05-23T16:24:06-05:00

Here, the figurative language of Millar's 1950s novels (like Vanish in an Instant and  Wives and Lovers) is replaced by a cleaner style which often focuses on extremes. "But Fielding’s pity, like his love and even his hate, was a variable thing, subject to changes in the weather, melting in

Margaret Millar’s A Stranger in My Grave (1960)2017-05-23T16:24:06-05:00
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