How Awful Is It? Liz Nugent’s Little Cruelties (2020)

2020-11-12T12:47:19-05:00

Betty Smith gave simple advice to writers: “First: Be understanding always. Keep the understanding you have and add on to it.” As the author of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1943)—a best-selling novel that challenged the myth of poverty as a choice, and allowed low/no-wage characters to demonstrate courage

How Awful Is It? Liz Nugent’s Little Cruelties (2020)2020-11-12T12:47:19-05:00

Emma Donoghue’s The Pull of the Stars (2020)

2020-10-22T15:54:37-05:00

Originally inspired by the 1918-2018 centenary of the Spanish Flu, Emma Donoghue began writing this novel in the tradition of her historical novels like Slammerkin and The Wonder. Her author’s note includes this statistic: “The influenza pandemic of 1918 killed more people than the First World War—an estimated 3

Emma Donoghue’s The Pull of the Stars (2020)2020-10-22T15:54:37-05:00

Jean-Christophe Réhel’s Tatouine (2018; Trans. Katherine Hastings & Peter McCambridge, 2020)

2020-09-30T08:44:22-05:00

Jean-Christophe Réhel’s Tatouine is every bit as remarkable as QC Fiction’s earlier offerings. Other QC Fiction titles are reviewed here (if you enjoy a wickedly operatic story), here (if you prefer to feel a little heart-broken for a long while), here (if you wonder what it would be like

Jean-Christophe Réhel’s Tatouine (2018; Trans. Katherine Hastings & Peter McCambridge, 2020)2020-09-30T08:44:22-05:00

Jean-Michel Fortier’s The Unknown Huntsman (2014; 2016)

2020-07-30T14:36:07-05:00

In a few weeks, Jean-Michel Fortier’s new novel The Electric Baths will be reviewed in the new issue of World Literature Today, translated by Katherine Hastings. A galloping read populated by an inordinate number of widows and tragic ends. There are some bloody bits but you're caught between gasping

Jean-Michel Fortier’s The Unknown Huntsman (2014; 2016)2020-07-30T14:36:07-05:00

Something for Every Summer Reading Mood (including the new Katrina Onstad)

2020-07-09T13:59:58-05:00

I’m even more likely to pick up dark and disturbing stories when the sun is beating down. This stems to my “discovery” of Stephen King in a teenaged summer, beginning with Night Shift and Skeleton Crew. There I was: lying on my back in the grass behind the rented

Something for Every Summer Reading Mood (including the new Katrina Onstad)2020-07-09T13:59:58-05:00
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