Precision: Souvankham Thammavongsa’s How to Pronounce Knife (2020)

2020-09-30T11:46:07-05:00

If you are considering whether or not to read Souvankham Thammavongsa’s collection of stories, you probably already know how to do it, how to pronounce the word ‘knife’. Readers of How to Pronounce Knife will not find solutions to age-old problems or innovation; readers will find clarity and acuity,

Precision: Souvankham Thammavongsa’s How to Pronounce Knife (2020)2020-09-30T11:46:07-05:00

Dear Reader: What’s Told? Or, the Telling of It?

2020-05-15T15:05:12-05:00

In my recent reading, it’s been as much about how the story is told as it’s been about the story itself. This certainly isn’t a new idea—these examples span three decades—but sometimes the phenomenon is more prevalent in my stacks. Maybe you’ve read some of these, or maybe

Dear Reader: What’s Told? Or, the Telling of It?2020-05-15T15:05:12-05:00

February 2019, In My Reading Log

2019-02-08T11:58:51-05:00

In which I discuss recent reading which deserves particular attention: two novels, spanning an African immigrant’s contemporary experience in London and a trio of English sisters’ experience of the interwar years, and a graphic memoir spanning a young boy’s experiences in Syria, France and Libya. In Harare North (2009), Brian

February 2019, In My Reading Log2019-02-08T11:58:51-05:00

Spring 2018, In My Reading Log

2018-06-05T10:29:52-05:00

Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2008) I thought the footnotes would make it fun (like in a Steven Haywood short story); I was more focussed on the ‘wondrous’ than the warning of brevity. In fact, Oscar’s life emerges from dictatorship and constricted choices, and you

Spring 2018, In My Reading Log2018-06-05T10:29:52-05:00

New Homes, Other Homes: Emigration and Immigration

2018-05-30T16:18:40-05:00

There are many amazing stories about moving from somewhere to elsewhere, about the process of elsewhere becoming somewhere. Take Rabindranath Maharaj's The Amazing Absorbing Boy - literally, amazing. It's right there on the cover. It's a real favourite of mine, in which seventeen-year-old Samuel reads comic books in Trinidad to

New Homes, Other Homes: Emigration and Immigration2018-05-30T16:18:40-05:00
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