Tamara Levine’s But Hope is Longer (2012)

2014-03-20T19:54:32-05:00

When Tamara Levine was diagnosed with breast cancer, she began sending e-mail letters to about fifty family members, friends and colleagues, to keep everybody in the loop. Second Story Press, 2012 Almost immediately, these letters took on a great significance in her Healing Journey, offering a kind of

Tamara Levine’s But Hope is Longer (2012)2014-03-20T19:54:32-05:00

Daniel Glattauer’s Love Virtually (2006; 2011)

2014-03-20T19:55:02-05:00

It began when I was a girl, with books like Jean Webster's Daddy Long Legs and Norma Fox Mazer's I, Trissy. These stories invited me directly into characters' private thoughts, via letters written to a trusted recipient and journal entries written for the writer's own eyes. Trans. Katharina Bielenberg

Daniel Glattauer’s Love Virtually (2006; 2011)2014-03-20T19:55:02-05:00

On Being Cloned, Trapped and Lonely

2014-03-15T20:01:40-05:00

B.I.P.'s Snips are short-hand responses to works; I usually opt for this format when I've read the book without taking many (or any) notes. Kate Wilhelm’s Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang (1976) Read: Mostly over breakfast, home-baked muffins or bakery-bought rugelach with coffee, perched on a stool in the kitchen, mostly

On Being Cloned, Trapped and Lonely2014-03-15T20:01:40-05:00

Orange January: The Love Letter (1995)

2014-03-15T18:37:06-05:00

The Love Letter was longlisted in 1996, the year that Helen Dunmore's The Spell of Winter won the Orange Prize. The idea intrigued me straight away, even before I saw the 1999 film of the same name: a love letter addressed and signed ambiguously, discovered by a 42-year-old

Orange January: The Love Letter (1995)2014-03-15T18:37:06-05:00

Letters: The City and the House (1985)

2014-03-15T18:29:43-05:00

Natalia Ginzburg's The City and the House (1985) Trans. Dick Davis This was Natalia Ginzburg's last published book, an epistolary work, which contains letters sent by a handful of Italian men and women who are struggling to understand their attachments to (and distances from) one another, those in

Letters: The City and the House (1985)2014-03-15T18:29:43-05:00