Non-Fiction November 2018: Week Two (Stryker and Binnie)

2018-10-30T18:52:56-05:00

Non-Fiction November is hosted this year by Kim (Sophisticated Dorkiness), Julie (JulzReads), Sarah (Sarah’s Book Shelves), Katie (Doing Dewey) and Rennie (What’s Nonfiction). It's a month-long celebration of everything nonfiction with a different prompt and a different host each week. Week Two is hosted by Sarah (Sarah’s Book Shelves) and requests

Non-Fiction November 2018: Week Two (Stryker and Binnie)2018-10-30T18:52:56-05:00

Shadow Giller: Joshua Whitehead’s Jonny Appleseed (2018)

2019-05-11T19:51:26-05:00

In Short presents a 300-word and spoiler-free summary, intended to have a broad appeal; In Detail focuses on one aspect of the book which I found remarkable, which might interest those who have already read the book or those with an interest in the mechanics of writing; In Other

Shadow Giller: Joshua Whitehead’s Jonny Appleseed (2018)2019-05-11T19:51:26-05:00

Louise Erdrich’s The Master Butchers Singing Club (2003)

2018-08-09T11:07:47-05:00

Unsurprisingly, there is a lot of talk of tissue and blood in this story and simmering beneath. Bodies and carcasses (and not all in the expected places) are salved and slaughtered, vulnerabilities exposed and secrets maintained. The intimacy which I longed for in The Beet Queen (1986) pulses and surges

Louise Erdrich’s The Master Butchers Singing Club (2003)2018-08-09T11:07:47-05:00

Any Other Way: How Toronto Got Queer

2017-10-05T08:17:57-05:00

Intentionally pushing the boundaries, this LGBTTIQQ2SA history aims for inclusivity, representation and originality. These essays are designed to "dazzle" and to "distract" readers from the convention (in this city and beyond) of the queer narrative's domination by the white/male/cis/middle-class/able-bodied perspective. There are more than 100 short pieces to expand

Any Other Way: How Toronto Got Queer2017-10-05T08:17:57-05:00

Darren Greer’s Advocate (2016)

2017-07-24T14:33:29-05:00

"The past presses so hard on the present, the present is badly bruised, blood brims under the skin." These lines from Brenda Shaughnessy's poem “Nachträglichkeit”* fit beautifully with Darren Greer's new novel, Advocate: Not only because much of Advocate is preoccupied with memory, with what the characters carry with them

Darren Greer’s Advocate (2016)2017-07-24T14:33:29-05:00