February 2019, In My Bookbag

2019-03-20T07:38:54-05:00

In which I read, while sitting in a café, in a library and in various TTC stations. While longer volumes, like Charles Palliser’s The Quincunx and Andrew Miller’s Now We Shall Be Entirely Free, stay at home. Charles Quimper’s In Every Wave (2017; Trans. Guil Lefebvre, 2018) Narrated by

February 2019, In My Bookbag2019-03-20T07:38:54-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “His Mother” (1973)

2018-12-18T15:14:34-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s first sentences are clear and purposeful: they orient readers and offer a glimpse of the story’s tone. “His mother had come of age in the war and then seemed to live a long greyness like a spun-out November.” Another remarkable aspect of her craft is the way

Mavis Gallant’s “His Mother” (1973)2018-12-18T15:14:34-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Potter” (1977)

2018-12-12T14:53:51-05:00

At first it is surprising. To come across the word ‘defenestration’ in a Mavis Gallant story. Often these are inward-looking stories, detailed and expansive glimpses into the interior lives of quiet – and often solitary – characters. Someone drives too quickly or protests the contents of a sermon, someone

Mavis Gallant’s “Potter” (1977)2018-12-12T14:53:51-05:00

In Other Reading

2018-12-03T17:18:46-05:00

Much of September and October were occupied by reading books which appeared on prizelists and a few which I thought might appear there. Most of these I’ve already discussed (a quick way to locate them is through my Autumn 2018 Prizelists and Events page, which collects the relevant posts

In Other Reading2018-12-03T17:18:46-05:00

Mazo de la Roche’s Renny’s Daughter (1951)

2018-08-30T17:19:07-05:00

Story-wise, this is the fourteenth volume in the Jalna series, and the house is about a hundred years old. There is time to reflect here, so that when a new character, like Humphrey Bell, is introduced, readers are reminded of all the other characters who have lived in his

Mazo de la Roche’s Renny’s Daughter (1951)2018-08-30T17:19:07-05:00