Slavery: Past and Present #280898 Reasons (1 of 4)

2021-02-01T17:25:23-05:00

In the past few weeks, I’ve read a few books for this reading project; at this rate, I will easily read the 32 books I’m aiming for (representing the percentage of people in one American state, who voted in November 2020 on a bill which maintained the legal option to

Slavery: Past and Present #280898 Reasons (1 of 4)2021-02-01T17:25:23-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “In a War”

2020-09-29T16:24:03-05:00

In a passage near the end of “Let It Pass”, Steven observes the precarious nature of memory. He openly acknowledges its fallibility: “I have probably altered my recollection of that moment, changed its shape, refined it, as I still sometimes will tinker with shreds of a dream.” So when

Mavis Gallant’s “In a War”2020-09-29T16:24:03-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Let It Pass”

2020-09-21T11:42:06-05:00

What I know now, that I didn’t know when I started to read my final three Gallant works in Montreal Stories is that “Let It Pass”, “In a War”, and “The Concert Party” are a sequence of stories. When I had a half hour to read on a weekend

Mavis Gallant’s “Let It Pass”2020-09-21T11:42:06-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Florida”

2020-04-21T11:43:39-05:00

This is the shortest in the cycle of Carette family stories, available to read online, with a short introduction by Lynne Tillman, on the Center for Fiction’s website. It’s one of their “model stories”—for good reason. It’s concise, yet still manages to highlight so many of Gallant’s trademarks: acute

Mavis Gallant’s “Florida”2020-04-21T11:43:39-05:00
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