Storytellers: Atlantic Canada (3 of 3)

2020-12-11T14:04:06-05:00

A few weeks ago, I mentioned how much Naomi’s Atlantic Canada reading has impacted the books in my stacks. (Check out her project here, along with pages dedicated to the Halifax Explosion and regional literary awards on Consumed by Ink.) I’m also enjoying my Here and Elsewhere project, which

Storytellers: Atlantic Canada (3 of 3)2020-12-11T14:04:06-05:00

Québecois Reads: Sealing the Deal

2019-05-27T18:57:14-05:00

The title of Pasha Malla’s 2015 article in The New Yorker’s Page-Turner says it all: “Too Different and Too Familiar: The Challenge of French-Canadian Literature.” Because it is a challenge to locate French-Canadian literature within the landscape of Canadian Literature, even for those of us who devote a significant

Québecois Reads: Sealing the Deal2019-05-27T18:57:14-05:00

Shadow Giller: Eric Dupont’s Songs for the Cold of Heart (2012; Trans. Peter McCambridge, 2018)

2018-11-17T16:06:21-05:00

Shadow Giller review contents: In Short, a 300-word and spoiler-free summary, intended to have a broad appeal; In Detail, elaborating on one aspect of the book which I found remarkable (perhaps only interesting for others who have read the book or who have an interest more mechanical aspects of

Shadow Giller: Eric Dupont’s Songs for the Cold of Heart (2012; Trans. Peter McCambridge, 2018)2018-11-17T16:06:21-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “New Year’s Eve” (1970)

2018-08-27T10:32:51-05:00

Amabel is just a few years older than young Shirley, who lost her young husband Pete when they were newlyweds in “The Accident”; barely married, not yet disappointed. Had Amabel and Shirley been friends, able to discuss their brief experiences of married life, I wonder how their opinions might

Mavis Gallant’s “New Year’s Eve” (1970)2018-08-27T10:32:51-05:00

Louis Riel: On the Page, On the Stage

2019-05-11T19:55:12-05:00

The Canadian Opera Company is now presenting a new 50th-anniversary production of "Louis Riel", originally written for the celebration of the Canadian centenary in 1967, with an attempt to shift that oh-so-colonial gaze, now including indigenous artists and languages with more nuanced representations of the historical figures. These are powerfully important

Louis Riel: On the Page, On the Stage2019-05-11T19:55:12-05:00
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