Jean-Christophe Réhel’s Tatouine (2018; Trans. Katherine Hastings & Peter McCambridge, 2020)

2020-09-30T08:44:22-05:00

Jean-Christophe Réhel’s Tatouine is every bit as remarkable as QC Fiction’s earlier offerings. Other QC Fiction titles are reviewed here (if you enjoy a wickedly operatic story), here (if you prefer to feel a little heart-broken for a long while), here (if you wonder what it would be like

Jean-Christophe Réhel’s Tatouine (2018; Trans. Katherine Hastings & Peter McCambridge, 2020)2020-09-30T08:44:22-05:00

Québecois Reads: Sealing the Deal

2019-05-27T18:57:14-05:00

The title of Pasha Malla’s 2015 article in The New Yorker’s Page-Turner says it all: “Too Different and Too Familiar: The Challenge of French-Canadian Literature.” Because it is a challenge to locate French-Canadian literature within the landscape of Canadian Literature, even for those of us who devote a significant

Québecois Reads: Sealing the Deal2019-05-27T18:57:14-05:00

Marie-Claire Blais, Reading for the #1965Club

2019-04-29T09:17:10-05:00

If you are reading this post because you are part of the #1965Club, and you haven’t heard of Marie-Claire Blais, you are about to wonder how that can be true. (And if you also haven't heard of #1965Club, please visit Karen's and Simon's sites to learn more.)  Blais has published

Marie-Claire Blais, Reading for the #1965Club2019-04-29T09:17:10-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Orphans’ Progress” (1965)

2019-03-05T17:42:12-05:00

Language is important in “Orphans’ Progress”, specifically the relationship between English-speakers in Ontario and French-speakers in Quebec (predominantly Montreal, with a reference to Chicoutimi). It matters, immediately and lastingly, because the orphans, Cathie and Mildred, are the children of an English-Canadian man and a French-Canadian woman. Governor General's Award Winner

Mavis Gallant’s “Orphans’ Progress” (1965)2019-03-05T17:42:12-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Up North” (1959)

2019-02-25T17:36:56-05:00

In “Saturday”, the mother had dreamed a different kind of life for her daughters. In “Up North”, Dennis’ mother is dreaming of a different kind of life for herself. She’s on a train, north of Montreal, heading for Abitibi, Quebec. That’s where Dennis’ father is working in the bush.

Mavis Gallant’s “Up North” (1959)2019-02-25T17:36:56-05:00
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