In Other Reading

2018-12-03T17:18:46-05:00

Much of September and October were occupied by reading books which appeared on prizelists and a few which I thought might appear there. Most of these I’ve already discussed (a quick way to locate them is through my Autumn 2018 Prizelists and Events page, which collects the relevant posts

In Other Reading2018-12-03T17:18:46-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Gabriel Baum 1935-” (1979)

2018-11-28T15:03:06-05:00

When readers meet Gabriel it is 1960 and he is twenty-five years old, fresh from having served in the French army for twenty months in Algeria. “War had never been declared. What Gabriel had engaged in was a long tactical exercise for which there was no compensation except experience.”

Mavis Gallant’s “Gabriel Baum 1935-” (1979)2018-11-28T15:03:06-05:00

Mazo de la Roche’s Renny’s Daughter (1951)

2018-08-30T17:19:07-05:00

Story-wise, this is the fourteenth volume in the Jalna series, and the house is about a hundred years old. There is time to reflect here, so that when a new character, like Humphrey Bell, is introduced, readers are reminded of all the other characters who have lived in his

Mazo de la Roche’s Renny’s Daughter (1951)2018-08-30T17:19:07-05:00

Non-Fiction November 2018 Week Five (Summary)

2018-11-28T14:09:12-05:00

Non-Fiction November is hosted this year by Kim (Sophisticated Dorkiness), Julie (JulzReads), Sarah (Sarah’s Book Shelves), Katie (Doing Dewey) and Rennie (What’s Nonfiction). It's a month-long celebration of everything nonfiction with a different prompt and a different host each week. The final week is hosted by Katie @ Doing Dewey: "It’s been

Non-Fiction November 2018 Week Five (Summary)2018-11-28T14:09:12-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Latehomecomer” (1974)

2018-11-19T18:14:22-05:00

Just four weeks ago, I was commenting on the first story in From the Fifteenth District, a novella, and noting how many key elements of Mavis Gallant’s storytelling were present in “The Four Seasons”. In “The Latehomecomer”, not only do some familiar elements resurface, but an actual character reappears.

Mavis Gallant’s “The Latehomecomer” (1974)2018-11-19T18:14:22-05:00