February 2019, In My Reading Log

2019-02-08T11:58:51-05:00

In which I discuss recent reading which deserves particular attention: two novels, spanning an African immigrant’s contemporary experience in London and a trio of English sisters’ experience of the interwar years, and a graphic memoir spanning a young boy’s experiences in Syria, France and Libya. In Harare North (2009), Brian

February 2019, In My Reading Log2019-02-08T11:58:51-05:00

Quarterly Stories: Winter 2018

2019-03-20T14:18:02-05:00

Faust, Gallant, Hawley, Madsen and Ross Short Stories in October, November and December "It was a long time - a long time watching him the way you watch a finger tightening slowly in the trigger of a gun – and then suddenly wrenching himself to action

Quarterly Stories: Winter 20182019-03-20T14:18:02-05:00

Shadow Giller: Eric Dupont’s Songs for the Cold of Heart (2012; Trans. Peter McCambridge, 2018)

2018-11-17T16:06:21-05:00

Shadow Giller review contents: In Short, a 300-word and spoiler-free summary, intended to have a broad appeal; In Detail, elaborating on one aspect of the book which I found remarkable (perhaps only interesting for others who have read the book or who have an interest more mechanical aspects of

Shadow Giller: Eric Dupont’s Songs for the Cold of Heart (2012; Trans. Peter McCambridge, 2018)2018-11-17T16:06:21-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Moslem Wife”

2018-11-07T19:11:06-05:00

So many of Mavis Gallant’s characters inhabit between spaces. Netta, too. Which is strange, because so many of Mavis Gallant’s other itinerant women are staying in hotels, but Netta is running one. And she is just as between as the rest of them. Once she said yes and, then,

Mavis Gallant’s “The Moslem Wife”2018-11-07T19:11:06-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Four Seasons” (1975)

2018-11-01T09:14:21-05:00

Today marks the launch of another Mavis Gallant short story collection): From the Fifteenth District. (Apologies for the double-post, but both Mavis Gallant and Margaret Atwood were scheduled to appear today: what a power-house duo!) The first story in this collection is billed as a novella, which is curious

Mavis Gallant’s “The Four Seasons” (1975)2018-11-01T09:14:21-05:00