Mavis Gallant’s “The Pegnitz Junction”

2018-05-15T09:41:01+00:00

“'Once there we are almost home. Pegnitz is a junction. Trains go through every few minutes, in all directions. In most directions,' he corrected." Herbert is careful to be exact when he's speaking to his young son, Little Bert, who believes every word his father says. Later when Herbert

Mavis Gallant’s “The Pegnitz Junction” 2018-05-15T09:41:01+00:00

Spring 2018: Quarterly Stories

2018-03-22T12:05:18+00:00

Endicott, Manto, King, Bruneau and Lispector Short Stories in January, February and March Whether in a dedicated collection or a magazine, these stories capture a variety of reading moods. This quarter, I returned to two favourite writers and also explored three new-to-me story writers.

Spring 2018: Quarterly Stories 2018-03-22T12:05:18+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Malcolm and Bea” (1968)

2018-03-05T15:06:08+00:00

They are no longer only thieves and rascals: “All men are filth.” Bea is perhaps no more unhappy than Marian Kimber, but she is more outwardly disgruntled. And even though she says this with a laugh, there’s an undeniable edge to it. “My mother was a saint and my

Mavis Gallant’s “Malcolm and Bea” (1968) 2018-03-05T15:06:08+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Treading Water” (1982)

2018-02-26T11:37:30+00:00

Fans of E.M. Delafield’s Provincial Lady’s diaries will find many chuckles in this very short excerpt from the imagined diary kept by composer Richard Wagner’s mistress (who became his wife seven years after their relationship began). The story is subtitled “More Sturm und Drang from Cosima Wagner’s Diaries” and

Mavis Gallant’s “Treading Water” (1982) 2018-02-26T11:37:30+00:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Burgundy Weekend” (1970-1971)

2018-03-06T12:17:35+00:00

Readers of Mavis Gallant’s early stories have endured a lot of unhappy spouses and unhappy children. In apartments and on beaches, in summer houses and on holiday, It’s hard enough; in confined quarters, it is stressful indeed. In “The Rejection” we have a divorced father and his daughter in

Mavis Gallant’s “The Burgundy Weekend” (1970-1971) 2018-03-06T12:17:35+00:00