Slavery: Past and Present #280898 Reasons (1 of 4)

2021-02-01T17:25:23-05:00

In the past few weeks, I’ve read a few books for this reading project; at this rate, I will easily read the 32 books I’m aiming for (representing the percentage of people in one American state, who voted in November 2020 on a bill which maintained the legal option to

Slavery: Past and Present #280898 Reasons (1 of 4)2021-02-01T17:25:23-05:00

Storytellers: Atlantic Canada (3 of 3)

2020-12-11T14:04:06-05:00

A few weeks ago, I mentioned how much Naomi’s Atlantic Canada reading has impacted the books in my stacks. (Check out her project here, along with pages dedicated to the Halifax Explosion and regional literary awards on Consumed by Ink.) I’m also enjoying my Here and Elsewhere project, which

Storytellers: Atlantic Canada (3 of 3)2020-12-11T14:04:06-05:00

Dear Reader: What’s Told? Or, the Telling of It?

2020-05-15T15:05:12-05:00

In my recent reading, it’s been as much about how the story is told as it’s been about the story itself. This certainly isn’t a new idea—these examples span three decades—but sometimes the phenomenon is more prevalent in my stacks. Maybe you’ve read some of these, or maybe

Dear Reader: What’s Told? Or, the Telling of It?2020-05-15T15:05:12-05:00

Ian Urbina’s The Outlaw Ocean (2019) #ReadtheChange

2020-02-05T17:30:42-05:00

The library classification data for The Outlaw Ocean suggests categories like Fisheries-Corrupt practices, Travel, Special interest, Adventure, True Crime. All of these seem correct and yet none of them seems right. This is just over 400 pages long – with another hundred pages of notes (sources, readings, digressions)

Ian Urbina’s The Outlaw Ocean (2019) #ReadtheChange2020-02-05T17:30:42-05:00
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