Pursuit: Gil Adamson’s Ridgerunner (2020)

2020-10-07T18:25:21-05:00

I read Gil Adamson’s The Outlander (2007) in February 2009, on my daily subway commute, and on the afternoon that I was nearly finished reading, I started a conversation about it with another commuter, who was also reading it. I waited until I’d moved towards the door, prepared to

Pursuit: Gil Adamson’s Ridgerunner (2020)2020-10-07T18:25:21-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Fenton Child”

2020-06-19T15:53:33-05:00

“‘Newborn, they’ve got these huge peckers,’ said Mr. Fenton. ‘I mean, really developed.’” When it comes to writing about Mavis Gallant’s short stories, I often want to begin with their first sentences. Sometimes there is such a swell of emotion at the story’s end, a marvelling at how entire

Mavis Gallant’s “The Fenton Child”2020-06-19T15:53:33-05:00

Dear Reader: What’s Told? Or, the Telling of It?

2020-05-15T15:05:12-05:00

In my recent reading, it’s been as much about how the story is told as it’s been about the story itself. This certainly isn’t a new idea—these examples span three decades—but sometimes the phenomenon is more prevalent in my stacks. Maybe you’ve read some of these, or maybe

Dear Reader: What’s Told? Or, the Telling of It?2020-05-15T15:05:12-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “Mlle. Dias de Corta”

2020-06-01T19:46:20-05:00

When Robert’s mother observes Alda’s signature and recognizes the pride and secrecy in its long loops and closed As, I think about the handwriting course that Mme Brounet took in Dédé. But I also think of Mavis Gallant writing long-hand and the hours she spent studying her own cursive

Mavis Gallant’s “Mlle. Dias de Corta”2020-06-01T19:46:20-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Sunday after Christmas” (1988)

2020-01-29T10:43:46-05:00

It seems to me that Mavis Gallant must have spent an inordinate amount of time on terraces. As places that seem associated with a view, this seems appropriate for a writer with a penchant for observation and acuity. But even while terraces seem related to looking outward – especially

Mavis Gallant’s “The Sunday after Christmas” (1988)2020-01-29T10:43:46-05:00
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