Summer 2019, In My Notebook

2019-08-27T12:56:24-05:00

This year I added another writer to my MRE list. In truth, he was one of the writers whose stories provoked that kind of MustReadEverything commitment early on, but I didn’t have a word for it yet. Authors who told the kind of stories that I wanted on my

Summer 2019, In My Notebook2019-08-27T12:56:24-05:00

Reading City Streets

2018-10-04T13:45:42-05:00

Yes, I am that person who has a WWJJD magnet on the fridge: What Would Jane Jacobs Do? So of course, when I learned of Susan Hughes’ new illustrated children’s book about Jacobs, Walking in the City (Illus. Valérie Boivin, 2018), I sought out a copy. The bulk of

Reading City Streets2018-10-04T13:45:42-05:00

Kerri Sakamoto’s Floating City (2018)

2019-02-11T16:07:34-05:00

It’s fitting that a story which includes the visionary figure of Buckminster Fuller is rooted in possibility rather than history: “It is not intended to follow the precise history of what was, but rather to imagine a story that might have been.” This note precedes the novel and sets

Kerri Sakamoto’s Floating City (2018)2019-02-11T16:07:34-05:00

Carianne Leung’s That Time I Loved You (2018)

2018-11-30T20:48:09-05:00

June is at the heart of this collection of stories; she is the link, the thread of light through a series of dark scenes. She is our guide to the ‘burbs: “The picture perfect suburban dream with the groomed lawns, nine-to-five jobs, 2.5 children kind of places. Domino effect.

Carianne Leung’s That Time I Loved You (2018)2018-11-30T20:48:09-05:00

Lee Maracle’s Conversations with Canadians (2017)

2018-09-17T18:56:43-05:00

It’s such a perfect way to begin the book, inviting readers to imagine sitting at a kitchen table with Sto:lo author, Lee Maracle. And because it is inspired by the recurring conversations which she has had, over the years, with Canadians, this motif is not only welcoming but also

Lee Maracle’s Conversations with Canadians (2017)2018-09-17T18:56:43-05:00