Madeleine Thien’s Do Not Say We Have Nothing (2016): Third Variation

2017-07-24T14:32:10-05:00

This is the third of three posts spiralling around the notes made while reading Do Not Say We Have Nothing. Each with ten parts. Thirty segments. As though my post is the aria and the thirty segments are the variations. In recognition of the importance which Bach's Goldberg Variations holds

Madeleine Thien’s Do Not Say We Have Nothing (2016): Third Variation2017-07-24T14:32:10-05:00

Madeleine Thien’s Do Not Say We Have Nothing (2016): Second Variation

2017-07-24T14:32:18-05:00

This is the second of three posts spiralling around the notes made while reading Do Not Say We Have Nothing. Each with ten parts. Thirty segments. As though my post is the aria and the thirty segments are the variations. In recognition of the importance which Bach's Goldberg Variations holds in

Madeleine Thien’s Do Not Say We Have Nothing (2016): Second Variation2017-07-24T14:32:18-05:00

Madeleine Thien’s Do Not Say We Have Nothing (2016): First Variation

2017-07-24T14:32:26-05:00

This will be the first of three posts spiralling around notes made while reading Do Not Say We Have Nothing. Each with ten parts. Thirty segments. As though my post is the aria and the thirty segments are the variations. In recognition of the importance which Bach's Goldberg Variations holds

Madeleine Thien’s Do Not Say We Have Nothing (2016): First Variation2017-07-24T14:32:26-05:00

Difficult Stories, Difficult Narrators: Five Novels

2020-10-22T12:25:41-05:00

Conflicted: that describes my first impressions after meeting Pillow in Andrew Battershill's Giller-nominated novel of the same name,and it also describes his perspective on the world. It's hard to be Pillow, to see all the angles which converge and diverge simultaneously on any single thought he has. For instance: "Pillow

Difficult Stories, Difficult Narrators: Five Novels2020-10-22T12:25:41-05:00

Listening for What’s Missing: Notes and novels, pages and spaces

2020-05-21T15:59:17-05:00

"I do know that missing is a feeling," Ruby announces, in Riel Nason's debut, The Town that Drowned. Is it? It's true for Ruby, and her story is preoccupied with what is being lost, a chronological tale rooted in the moments of losing. At first glance, it seems as though Lydia Perović's All

Listening for What’s Missing: Notes and novels, pages and spaces2020-05-21T15:59:17-05:00
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