Mavis Gallant’s “A State of Affairs”

2020-06-01T20:09:43-05:00

If Forain was reading this story, the one which follows the story about him, in Mavis Gallant’s ninth collection, he would be so disappointed to hear that M. Wroblewski can’t find a thing to read in Paris. “There are no books worth reading—nothing but pornography and translated Western trash.”

Mavis Gallant’s “A State of Affairs”2020-06-01T20:09:43-05:00

An Act of Homage: Rereading Wayson Choy

2020-04-30T09:08:45-05:00

Rereading Wayson Choy’s The Jade Peony (1995) is a blatant act of homage. When I first heard Choy read from his work, he was promoting his memoir Paper Shadows (1999) at a Pride event. He was reading with Marnie Woodrow and Sky Gilbert: one, a curly-haired slightly messy young

An Act of Homage: Rereading Wayson Choy2020-04-30T09:08:45-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “From Cloud to Cloud” (1985)

2020-04-21T10:00:32-05:00

Having published one hundred and sixteen stories in The New Yorker, Mavis Gallant’s regular readers would have had to wait from April 15 until July 8 in 1985, to learn how life has been for the Carette sisters. The story opens like this: “The family’s experience of Raymond was

Mavis Gallant’s “From Cloud to Cloud” (1985)2020-04-21T10:00:32-05:00

Samar Yazbek’s A Woman in the Crossfire: Diaries of the Syrian Revolution (2012) #ReadtheChange

2020-04-13T16:24:43-05:00

Some days I picked up Samar Yazbek’s A Woman in the Crossfire, to read only two pages, and set it aside. Other days I picked it up and forced myself to read a certain number of sections (being that it’s a diary). Afterwards, whether a couple of pages or

Samar Yazbek’s A Woman in the Crossfire: Diaries of the Syrian Revolution (2012) #ReadtheChange2020-04-13T16:24:43-05:00

Mavis Gallant’s “The Statues Taken Down” (1965)

2019-12-24T08:18:22-05:00

Readers never meet her directly, but we are told that she looks like the Holbein portrait of Lady Barker. (Here shown in such a way that it’s easy to imagine a wallet photo.) This is the mother of Hal and Dorothy. Once George Crawley’s wife. On the surface, this

Mavis Gallant’s “The Statues Taken Down” (1965)2019-12-24T08:18:22-05:00