Mavis Gallant’s “The Statues Taken Down” (1965)

2019-12-24T08:18:22-05:00

Readers never meet her directly, but we are told that she looks like the Holbein portrait of Lady Barker. (Here shown in such a way that it’s easy to imagine a wallet photo.) This is the mother of Hal and Dorothy. Once George Crawley’s wife. On the surface, this

Mavis Gallant’s “The Statues Taken Down” (1965)2019-12-24T08:18:22-05:00

Shadow Giller: Stephen Price’s Lampedusa (2019)

2019-11-15T12:37:31-05:00

There is a line in Stephen Price’s 2016 novel, By Gaslight, which seems to suit his new novel generally: “Everything is about the dead.” And another which seems even more appropriate: “The truth that is found in a story is a different kind of truth, but it is not

Shadow Giller: Stephen Price’s Lampedusa (2019)2019-11-15T12:37:31-05:00

Khanh Ha’s Mrs. Rossi’s Dream (2019)

2019-06-03T12:08:56-05:00

Khanh Ha’s third novel, Mrs. Rossi’s Dream (The Permanent Press, 2019) is an ideal companion to Flesh (2012) and The Demon Who Peddled Longing (2014). The reader’s guide is Lê Giang: the story begins and ends with him, in 1987, when he is living in a coastal town in the

Khanh Ha’s Mrs. Rossi’s Dream (2019)2019-06-03T12:08:56-05:00

Andrew Miller’s Now We Shall Be Entirely Free (2018)

2019-03-26T11:31:53-05:00

Discovering Andrew Miller’s work, at this stage of his career, reminds me of the solid sense of anticipation that I felt upon reading Rupert Thomson’s Secrecy (2013). As authors of 8 and 11 novels respectively, I’m surprised that I hadn’t been tempted to read one of their books until

Andrew Miller’s Now We Shall Be Entirely Free (2018)2019-03-26T11:31:53-05:00