Open a book this minute and start reading. Don’t move until you’ve reached page fifty. Until you’ve buried your thoughts in print. Cover yourself with words. Wash yourself away. Dissolve. Carol Shields Republic of Love

In Cainsville: A Giveaway

The second volume in Kelley Armstrong’s Cainsville series is an enticing follow-up to Omens.

Random House Canada, 2014

Those who have read the Otherworld series will recall that the earliest novels concentrated on Elena’s character and here, too, in her return to Cainsville, the main character remains consistent.

Olivia Taylor-Jones is now seeing both [...]

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Literary Kismet: The Tin Flute and Man in the Shadows

Once a week when he was in Montreal, Conor walked along St. Catherine Street to dine at the St. Lawrence Hotel. In a freshly pressed suit, starched shirt and perfectly tied cravat, he was the picture of sophistication. He even sported a new walking stick. He would often bring a newspaper to give [...]

Daughters, Mothers: Half-Formed and Otherwise

Eimear McBride’s A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing (2014)

Reading.

Then Not.

Simon & Schuster, 2014

Sharp sentences.

Jabbing thoughts.

Unkindnesses bearing down.

Book, set aside.

Pause.

And here is where the experience of reading A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing may end for many readers.

Some, however, will lick their wounds and pick [...]

Between Generations: Two Novels and a Memoir

Cristina Henriquez’s The Book of Unknown Americans (2014)

Bond Street Books – Random House, 2014

It’s risky, fragmenting narration into a large number of voices, but it’s the perfect format for a novel about the experiences of newcomers to the United States, who can have an astonishing variety of experiences.

Readers might expect to [...]

Dewey’s Read-A-Thon, Autumn 2014

It’s here. It’s here. It’s finally here! And we’ll be updating this post throughout the day (for the three of us). Thanks so much for stopping by.

Hour Nineteen: Update, BIP Snack: There might be something sweet. Mixed with whiskey. This might mean things are winding up. More of a tendency towards napping as the [...]

Dewey’s Read-A-Thon, Autumn 2014 (Plans)

It’s possible that my favourite part of read-a-thon-ing lies in assembling the stacks. Perhaps not only possible. Perhaps probable.

It’s certain that my favourite part of assembling a stack of books lies in the dreaming. Last year I successfully completed a record amount of NOT reading on Dewey’s autumn weekend.

But I have allowed myself [...]

Katja Rudolph’s Little Bastards in Springtime (2014)

In 1992, Jevrem lived through the siege of Sarajevo and Katja Rudolph’s novel considers the impact of such trauma, which extends far beyond national borders. He develops fervent opinions and beliefs based on his early experiences and the events witnessed in his family, ensuing losses and severences.

HarperCollins, 2014

“What was wrong with [...]

Shifting Powers: Three Novels

Gordon Henderson’s Man in the Shadows (2014)

HarperCollins, 2014

“As he helped her into the carriage, Agnes Macdonald whispered demurely, “I can lean on no other arm like yours.” Macdonald sat back contentedly and called out to the driver, “Buckley, take us to the office.”

It would have been simple, the man across the [...]

Theresa Kishkan’s Mnemonic: A Book of Trees (2011)

Like Sharon Butala in Perfection of the Morning (1994) and Candace Savage in The Geography of Blood (2012), Theresa Kishkan explores the relationship between landscape and memory.

Goose Lane Editions, 2011

The essays in Mnemonic are titled in two ways, first with the Latin name for a tree and, second, with a reference to [...]

Linda Holeman, Peter May, and Jeffery Deaver

Each of the novels below is, in the right reader’s hands, a pageturner. Each of the authors will also appear at this year’s IFOA. Whether you attend, or read, or both: enjoy!

Random House of Canada, 2014

Linda Holeman’s The Devil on Her Tongue (2014) The heart of Linda Holeman’s novel is Diamantina and [...]