Open a book this minute and start reading. Don’t move until you’ve reached page fifty. Until you’ve buried your thoughts in print. Cover yourself with words. Wash yourself away. Dissolve. Carol Shields Republic of Love

In My Reading Log

The majority of my reading time this year has been devoted to the books which have been living for years, though neglected, on my own bookshelves. In May and June, I had a planned rebellion, and I enjoyed a great number of new books. But now I have returned to my own shelves once more.

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Literary Kismet: Highway and Robinson

Facts are only the random detritus of our lives until they are connected by story. Stories, to paraphrase Robert Kroetsch, make us real. If there is anything like truth accessible to us in the world, it must be through the ways we tell of ourselves to each other.

Tomson Highway’s Comparing Mythologies (2003)

 

 

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On reading, at last, Rilla of Ingleside

I can no longer claim that reading about grown-up Anne is boring, when that would clearly mean I, as a grown-up, must be boring too.

So I have had to come up with other reasons to avoid reading the final Anne book. Knowing what a chore it was for LMM to continue writing the Anne stories? […]

Sigal Samuel’s The Mystics of Mile End (2015)

There are five windows on the cover of Sigal Samuel’s debut novel; in only one of them does a pair of people appear.

Freehand Books, 2015

In three of the windows there is a solitary silhouette, and in the window at the top, the blind is nearly pulled to the bottom of the sill.

The […]

Quarterly Stories: Summer 2015

This year I have read some stand-out collections, but for the most part I neglected to take notes from them:

Joy Williams’ Honored Guests, Kathleen Winter’s The Freedom in American Songs, Jessica Grant’s Making Light of Tragedy, Shawn Syms’ Nothing Looks Familiar, Elaine McCluskey’s Hello, Sweetheart, Julia Leggett’s Gone South and Other Ways to Disappear, Mark Anthony […]

“Wood” Alice Munro

Strangely enough, although I read this story twice earlier this year as well, when I scanned the table of contents I could not place it.

Planning to reread for a third time this morning, I had no idea; it wasn’t until the talk of the truck and Roy’s need to gather the wood sooner than expected, that I […]

Harbourfront and IFOA 2015

My IFOA Wednesdays are starting later than usual this year because I have been indulging in new books this summer. (You can check out my Summer Reading To-Do List, for all kinds of reading weather.)

But now that I’m looking at the calendar, there are dozens of books (new and backlisted) catching my attention.

Many […]

Ins Choi’s Subway Stations of the Cross (2015)

Ins Choi’s play, Kim’s Convenience is already on my list of favourite reads for this year.

House of Anansi, 2015

I know, I know, it’s only August, but I am certain already (because it literally made me laugh out loud several times and then it made me cry).

It was first produced here in Toronto in […]

Gilaine E. Mitchell’s The Breaking Words (2015)

As was the case with her first novel, Gilaine Mitchell’s follow-up is set in the small town of Stirling.

In her debut, Film Society, a group of women meet to watch their favourite films in the red brick house at the end of Anne Street.

One of the characters in Film Society, Del, works at the Sears […]

Peter Nowak’s Humans 3.0

When I was in the tenth grade, nothing about technology intimidated me. I signed up for classes in high school which taught binary and how to write simple programs, and my first full-time job was working with a woman who could program in COBOL.

Goose Lane Editions, 2015

So I knew how to instruct […]